Saudi Arabia: Al Farabi – Bringing New Sounds of Music to the Kingdom

There have been heated discussions on this blog on whether music and musical instruments is haram (forbidden) in the Muslim faith.  Saudi Arabia is among the most conservative of Muslim countries.  However, Al Farabi is making a splash in the Kingdom bringing new sounds of music to the Kingdom through a special combination of instruments which are fused together with a genuine Arabic voice.  The essence of their music and sound is Arabic poetry which is popular among Saudi Arabia’s youth.

The Saudi audience of Al Farabi consists of individuals who love music and have been waiting to hear a new sound that speaks to their souls, hearts and emotions.  Additionally, Al Farabi has taken the initiative to launch music workshops.

One of Al Farabi’s most popular songs is Al Mothanna – The Story of a King. The idea for the song came from Al-Mothanna, who is a fan of King Faisal and thought of what lyrics should be chosen to represent his character best throughout a song. Al-Mothanna’s knowledge of Arabian poetry helped him choose some lines of Al-Mutanabi’s poems, one of the most famous poets in the history of Arabs. Later on, a basic musical structure of classic and electric guitars was added alongside a bass guitar and a basic beat by Al-Mothanna and Diya, and the first demo had become a reality. After forming Al Farabi, different instruments were added, such as oud (a form of lute) and piano, and performed live at TEDx Arabia in Jeddah and in the royal residence palace and congress hall in Salzburg, Austria.

 

 

Al Farabi anticipates releasing an album in Saudi Arabia by mid-2012.

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28 Responses

  1. Entertainment music , vocal or instrumental is definitely HARAM in Deen e Islam, orthodox, conservative or liberal , a haram is a haram forbidden is forbidden , no argument in that and a country which call itself Islamic, has no right to allow its public use . Foreigners and outsiders living there have a right to entertain themselves but without causing interference in the lives of the devout who don’t like to witness such immoralities being forbidden for them. But saudi Arabia is a strange Islamic country where alcohol industry thrives, where young kids are considered to be a sunnah to be married at 6 and consummated at 9 because of Saheeh Ahadees (sic) and a practice to go to poor countries with very poor islamic population and exploit their
    buds of children and take pride in deflowering them, what a disgrace ?
    If obviously this is too objectionable for some , there is the most convenient Misyar available which in fact has not even remotely any sanction in Islam and is a clear cut saudi sanctioned prostitution.
    So in Saudi Arabia , the place which has the holiest of holy heritage of Islam, drink as much as you like, it is flowing in the God made rich country like water in the rivers , do marry 6 yrs kids , do misyar the Saudi’s Allah’s sanctioned way of fulfilling basal instincts , dance and drown into music with or without naked dancing girls . Inshah ( rival of Allah ) Shaitaan shall be awaiting you folks in the HELLFIRE .

  2. Zaheerhusain Khan, on November 26, 2011 at 4:09 am said:
    Entertainment music , vocal or instrumental is definitely HARAM in Deen e Islam, orthodox, conservative or liberal , a haram is a haram forbidden is forbidden , no argument in that and a country which call itself Islamic, has no right to allow its public use . Foreigners and outsiders living there have a right to entertain themselves but without causing interference in the lives of the devout who don’t like to witness such immoralities being forbidden for them. But saudi Arabia is a strange Islamic country where alcohol industry thrives, where young kids are considered to be a sunnah to be married at 6 and consummated at 9 because of Saheeh Ahadees (sic) and a practice to go to poor countries with very poor islamic population and exploit their
    buds of children and take pride in deflowering them, what a disgrace ?
    If obviously this is too objectionable for some , there is the most convenient Misyar available which in fact has not even remotely any sanction in Islam and is a clear cut saudi sanctioned prostitution.
    So in Saudi Arabia , the place which has the holiest of holy heritage of Islam, drink as much as you like, it is flowing in the God made rich country like water in the rivers , do marry 6 yrs kids , do misyar the Saudi’s Allah’s sanctioned way of fulfilling basal instincts , dance and drown into music with or without naked dancing girls . Inshah ( rival of Allah ) Shaitaan shall be awaiting you folks in the HELLFIRE .

  3. Told ya 😉

  4. That was pretty good. Don’t know why, but that King Faisal caricature always reminds me of the Zappa album “Sheik Yerbouti”. Thanks for the song AB, it was actually pretty good.

  5. I feel sorry when I listen to such poor singing skill esp when the lyrics are taken from one of the most famous poems in the whole Arabian history. And what’s with the western music? No identity whatsoever! that’s really terrible..

    King Faisal deserves much much more than this peice.

    @ Khan.. First happy new year. Second, why are you so angry?? Lol!
    In fact, your post has so many funny points that I still can’t decide where to start!!
    Music for most schools of thought is haram, but there are scholars who consider it halal. So you need to check your facts.
    What exactly is liberal Islam? And since when liberals have ANY problem with music?
    I have been living in this country all my life, we have so many mistakes and of course we are not saints. Your remarks are nothing but over-generalized judgements and ridiculous allegations which have no basis. Don’t let your bias and hatred (the hellfire bit shows that:D) blind you.

  6. So grateful my Book tells me to “make a joyful noise unto the Lord”. I cannot imagine life without music.

  7. @Linda

    Pretty sad that you’d have to rely on a book to reaffirm what your heart tells you to enjoy. Something that definitely goes for Muslims as well.

  8. Beautiful music! Wish I could understand what he was saying :)-

  9. After looking at King Feisal’s picture on the video, it made me wonder why so many saudi males, especially the kings, have such a dour, sour, unsmiling look on their faces. Must be a cultural thingee :)-

  10. I think forbidding all the fun and beautiful things in life is evil.

    Music elevates the soul.
    But that would elevate the Muslims above the low limits of Islam and encourage them to think it over and leave for something better, loftier and morally more advanced.
    And we can’t have that now can we?

  11. Why is every thing king-centered in arabia?

    where is the queen?

  12. oops , sorry the ,,queens? more than one;)

  13. @Aafke

    “But that would elevate the Muslims above the low limits of Islam and encourage them to think it over and leave for something better, loftier and morally more advanced.
    And we can’t have that now can we?”

    So dramatic lol. What are you talking about? There are plenty of Muslim musicians that would never dare question the word of God, even if music isn’t a part of their religion. It’s like how some Christians incorporate music in their services, that reenforces the notion of God.

    If a person has faith, they see God in everything. They can’t rationalize their views.

  14. @Zaheerhusain Khan…

    If you think music is so haram as you stated so strongly above why on your facebook page is it a subject that you discuss under Arts and Entertainment? Or is that not you?

  15. @ana – ‘where is the queen?’

    I’m right here, can I help you with something?

  16. It is just a shame that so many Muslims miss out on so much by not listening to music. They are obeying a prejudice of the founder of their religion not any absolute command by any supreme being (assuming such a being exists)

  17. I’ve been in many predominantly Muslim countries and I really think it must be a minority of Muslims who do not listen to music.

  18. @lynn,

    No , thanks i’m not lookig for reverts;)

  19. Music has always been part of Islamic history and culture and there are even hadith where Muhammed was listening to music. Of course very strict people try to interpret those as “all he allowed was …this”. There is no Quranic verse against it accept one that refers to “idle talk” which consertative folk have tried to tell us what it means. But even there he listened to women singing and dogmatic Muslims will try to argue that men shouldn’t hear women singing when that isn’t what happened- according to there documents.

    @Hindi everything is MAN centered. Men rule everything- not women. You don’t hear about a queen, but King Abdullah’s daughter is quite active.

  20. I thought there was a pretty clear verse, or perhaps it was just a hadith, specifically against women playing flutes. It was a while ago but I know that I saw it somewhere. It was something along the lines of how instruments were bad but a woman on the flute was a definite no no.

  21. Lynn….if I had to guess as to a specific prohibition..the flute looks an awful lot like a certain part of the male anatomy…*hint hint*…so we can’t allow women being all sexily suggestive by having them suck…I mean blow..I mean play on a flute now, can we? Just a thought that came to mind.

    I personally do not recall a specific hadith against the flute but who knows. 😉

  22. @Lynn,
    Sorry but mostly that was a whole load of tosh! Most of it was what scholars have said – nothing from Quran that wasn’t heavily interpreted and conflicting hadith. The conclusion that tambourines are allowed because wedding singing is an “announcement” is something that people are free to believe or not. But based on the extensive use of music throughout Islamic history and culture not many are very convinced.

    The thing specifiying flutes was directed at shepards. Anyway, the sort of “logic” presented in that fatwa was ridiculous. With that sort of leaway you can make things however you want.

  23. @Sandy – ‘Sorry but mostly that was a whole load of tosh!’

    You’re preaching to the choir there Sandy. I feel that way with pretty much everything to do with Islam.

  24. But the point is Lynn, most MUSLIMS historically speaking and today- don’t think music is haram.

  25. i do write songs….. 🙂

  26. @Coolred..omg that was hilarious.loool

  27. @JC, I only meant my Book tells me to sing and dance and be joyful, There are those who interpret the Quran as forbidding those activities.

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